Graduate School Resources for Pre-Med Students

For information about Professional Schools, please see the links below:

Medical School
http://www.aspiringdocs.org
http://www.aamc.org/students/start.htm

Dental School
http://www.adea.org/
http://www.ada.org/

Physical Therapy
http://www.apta.org
http://www.ptcas.org/ProgramPrereqs.html

Veterinary College
http://www.aavmc.org/

Physician's Assistant
http://www.aapa.org/

Optometry School
http://www.opted.org/

Environmental Science-Courses Offered

ENSC 201 Introduction to Environmental Science F even
3 SH
This course explores the root causes of the global environmental quality deterioration: overpopulation, depletion of natural resources, and subsequent pollution. Students will consider differing world viewpoints and development of possible solutions. This course does not satisfy the general education requirement in Natural Science. Cross-listed as CHEM 250.
       
ENSC 328 (WI) Conservation Biology F Odd 4 SH
This course provides students with an in-depth exploration of the conservation and management of ecosystems and protected areas from a scientific perspective. The course focuses on issues ranging from genetics, policy, stakeholders, technology, diplomacy, biodiversity, endangerment, and deforestation. While the course will focus on terrestrial systems, which will be more immediately familiar to most students, the course will also include components of avian, freshwater, and marine conservation. The intersection between human populations and biodiversity will be a major theme of this course. Understanding of conservation and ecosystems will be a capstone goal of the course. At the end of the course, students will have been exposed to the fields of environmental law, international environ mental law, anthropology, GIS, mammalogy, ornithology, ichthyology, herpetology, and invertebrate biology. Field trips to Uwharrie National Forest, the Carnivore Conservation Trust, NC Zoo and/or Duke Primate Center will be included in this course. The course will be taught in a seminar format, with lab period. It will involve heavy emphasis on readings from the current, primary, peer-reviewed literature, but it will also require background material from a text. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BIOL 211-212. Cross-listed as BIOL 328.
       
ENSC 401 Jr. Research I UD 1 SH
In the first semester of a major's junior year (or with instructor approval for nontraditionally calendared students), the student will engage in one-on-one directed research with natural sciences faculty on an appropriate independent program of scientific investigation. This first semester of a 4-semester sequence will surround the identification of a potential undergraduate thesis project and the literature review for the background of said project. Once appropriate literature has been reviewed between the student and faculty, a formal project of scientific investigation will be identified. Onceweekly meetings throughout the semester will occur, at minimum. Grading will be based upon meeting participation, background research, and a semester's end paper and presentation of the project identified, its background, and the methods to be used in upcoming semesters of this sequence. Prerequisites: instructor approval, BIOL 211, BIOL 212, CHEM 301, CHEM 302, and ENSC 201.
       
ENSC 402 Jr. Research II UD 1 SH
In this second semester of the major's junior year and second semester of a foursemester sequence(or with instructor approval for nontraditionally calendared students), data collection or synthesis will commence on the project identified in Jr. Research I. Weekly meetings with faculty will provide advice and assurance of student performance of this "pilot" semester of individual scientific investigation. Grading will be based on a semester-end paper and poster presentation of the pilot project's progress. Prerequisites: instructor approval and Jr. Research I.
       
ENSC 403 Environmental Science Internship UD 1 SH
This course is designed to require students to engage in some form of environmental internship at some point in their undergraduate career. Internships may include, but are not limited to, internships with the NC Zoo, local/state/federal environmental regulatory agencies, environmental field study or assistantship, etc. Appropriateness of the internship for the course curriculum will be planned and concluded in advance between the student and faculty advisor(s). Grading will be based upon performance within the internship, plus a paper and presentation on the internship given during semester of enrollment for this course.
       
ENSC 501 Sr. Research  UD 1 SH
In this third semester of the four-semester sequence and the first semester of the major's senior year (or with instructor approval for nontraditionally calendared students), final data collection will occur and analysis will be complete for the project identified in Jr. Research I and II. Meetings will occur weekly. Grading will be based upon a complete independent research paper (student's final draft version) designed for scientific publication on the program of study identified in Jr. Research I and II. Prerequisites: instructor approval and Jr. Research II.
       
ENSC 502 General Ecology S odd
4 SH
Plants and animals in their natural surroundings. Prerequisites: Two courses in BIOL. Cross-listed as BIOL 502.
       
ENSC 503 Sr. Research II UD 1 SH
In this final semester of a four-semester sequence and the second semester of the major's senior year (or with instructor approval for nontraditionally calendared students), the student will pursue publication of his/her research and analyses. The final paper submitted in Sr. Research I will be edited by faculty and student during the semester and submitted for scientific publication. Grading will be based on faculty's evaluation of the paper's quality and a final oral presentation on the paper given at a scientific conference (e.g., professional society annual meeting or at the annual Milton Rose Science Symposium at Pfeiffer University) or formal academic assembly. Prerequisites: instructor approval and SR Research I.

Biology-Courses Offered

Courses Offered 

BIOL 211 General Biology I F 4 SH

BIOL 212 General Biology II S 4 SH
An introductory level, 2-semester sequence with emphasis on history, philosophy, and methodology of science; cell structure and function of major systems of vascular plants and vertebrate animals, genetics, evolution, and ecology of major groups of plants and animals. The second semester is a continuation of the first semester; thus, the first semester is a prerequisite to the second.* These courses may be used to satisfy the general education requirement in laboratory science and are the first courses for majors in Biology.
* In the event of transfer credits, permission of the instructor will suffice for prerequisites.

BIOL 305 Invertebrate Zoology UD 4 SH
A study of the form and function of major phyla of invertebrate animals with emphasis on phylogeny.

BIOL 320 Biological Anthropology F even 4 SH
(WI) Biological Anthropology covers concepts relating to the origin, evolution, and biological nature of the human species. The course explores the fundamental principles of the evolution and biological adaptation of our own species, Homo sapiens. This search takes the student in a number of directions by way of evolutionary theory - through genetics and the diversity of modern human populations, through the fossil record of human physical evolution, to a study of behaviors and physical traits we share with other primates. Finally, the course looks at how paleoanthropologists interpret and reconstruct the biological and Biology/43 cultural adapations of our earliest hominid ancestors. The class utilizes several formats, including lecture, discussion, labs, computer programs, and visits to the Asheboro Zoo and Duke Primate Center. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: BIOL 212 or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 321 Biological Evolution S odd
4 SH
(WI) This course will introduce students to the major principles of evolutionary biology. Topics covered will include elementary population genetics, the theory of evolution by natural selection, concepts of fitness and adaptation, genetic and developmental bases of evolutionary change, modes of speciation, morphological and molecular evolution, principles of systemic biology, palenotology and macroevolutionary trends in evolution, extinction and human evolution. Lab will include activities and experiments, recent articles and discussions, and student presentations. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BIOL 211and BIOL 212.

BIOL 322 Introduction to Wildlife Biology S even 4 SH
This course introduces students interested in biology, environmental science, or any natural sciences to the breadth and types of potential avenues of studying our earth and its biodiversity. While the course will focus on domestic wildlife, which will be more immediately familiar to introductory-level students, the course will also include a component of international wildlife. Natural history of animal (and, to a lesser degree) plant groups will be a major focus of the course, including terrestrial, avian, and marine/freshwater wildlife. Understanding of conservation and ecosystems will be a capstone goal of the course. At the end of the course, students will have been exposed to the fields of mammalogy, ornithology, ichthyology, herpetology, and invertebrate biology. Charismatic megafauna will be the flagship species most studied in this introductory course. Field trips to Uwharrie National Forest, the Carnivore Conservation Trust, NC Zoo and/or Duke Primate Center will be included in this course. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 and 212 preferred.

BIOL 324 Principles of Microbiology S 4 SH
In the second semester of a pre-nursing major's Freshman year, the student will enroll in this 4 semester credit course. Principles of Microbiology will provide an overview of bacteria, viruses, and eukaryotic microorganisms responsible for human disease. Mechanisms of disease progression will be discussed in conjunction with immunological defenses of human hosts. Microbial growth, structure, and control will be studied with a focus on molecular and genetic aspects. The course will not be part of the curriculum for the biology major. This course is appropriate for students who intend to pursue careers in nursing, and who require a microbiology course with a medical microbiology focus. The course will be designed as an introductory level biology course. Prerequisites: instructor approval and CHEM 301.

BIOL 328 Conservation Biology F odd 4 SH
(WI) This course provides students with an in-depth exploration of the conservation and management of ecosystems and protected areas from a scientific perspective. The course focuses on issues ranging from genetics, policy, stakeholders, technology, diplomacy, biodiversity, endangerment, and deforestation. While the course will focus on terrestrial systems, which will be more immediately familiar to most students, the course will also include components of avian, freshwater, and marine conservation. The intersection between human populations and biodiversity will be a major theme of this course. Understanding of conservation and ecosystems will be a capstone goal of the course. At the end of the course, students will have been exposed to the fields of environmental law, international environ mental law, anthropology, GIS, mammalogy, ornithology, ichthyology, herpetology, and invertebrate biology. Field trips to Uwharrie National Forest, the Carnivore Conservation Trust, NC Zoo and/or Duke Primate Center will be included in this course. The course will be taught in a seminar format, with lab period. It will involve heavy emphasis on readings from the current, primary, peer-reviewed literature, but it will also require background material from a text. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BIOL 211-212. Cross-listed as ENSC 328.

BIOL 403 Microbiology F odd 4 SH
Biology of bacteria, molds, yeasts, and viruses. Fundamentals of immunology. Prerequisites: Two courses in BIOL.

BIOL 411 Genetics F 4 SH
The principles of heredity; the cytological and molecular bases of genetic phenomena. Combined lecture, discussion, and laboratory. Prerequisites: Two courses in BIOL and CHEM 302.

BIOL 414 Cell and Molecular Biology F even 4 SH
Organization of cellular and sub-cellular components; physical and chemical bases of cell activity. Prerequisites: Two courses in BIOL and CHEM 302.

BIOL 415 Vertebrate Morphology and Development F odd 4 SH
(WI) Patterns of development; control processes during development; comparisons of anatomical features of vertebrates. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: BIOL 212.

BIOL 417 Plant Morphology UD 4 SH
A study of form and anatomy in the major groups of plants with emphasis on phylogenetic relationships. Prerequisite: BIOL 212.

BIOL 418 Plant Physiology S even 4 SH
A study of the principal physiological processes of plants. Prerequisites: BIOL 212, CHEM 302.

BIOL 420 Microbial Genetics S odd 4 SH
(WI) The lecture component of Microbial Genetics will place special emphasis on the integration of genetic studies with biochemical and physical analysis of synthesis, structure, and function of nucleic acid and protein. The genetics of the well-studied bacterium Escherichia coli will be presented as well as genetic and molecular studies of other microorganisms and viruses with ecological, medical, and industrial significance. The laboratory component of the course will introduce students to classical and modern genetic approaches for studying microorganisms. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BIOL 411 and CHEM 403.

BIOL 421 Forensic Science S 4 SH
(WI) The course will introduce students to the theory and technique used in Forensic Science. Topics will include DNA fingerprinting, Southern Analysis, PCR, fingerprinting analysis, hair and fiber analysis, forensic anthroplogy, blood serology, toxicology, and basic chemical identification and separations. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 and BIOL 212; junior standing or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 422 Molecular Genetics of Development S odd 4 SH
A study of how eukaryotic organisms develop, and the molecular and genetic processes that control development. A survey of developmental biology from egg to adult (differentiated organs) will be covered, along with topics describing the control of eukaryotic gene expression. Laboratory emphasis will include Caenorhabditis elegans and other model organisms, and molecular techniques in genetic analysis. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BIOL 411 and CHEM 403.

BIOL 423 Applied Biotechnology Research I UD 3 SH
This course emphasizes an introduction to the development of laboratory and research skills related to areas of biotechnology (Part I of II). Introductory modules included in Part I are experiment design and lab safety, applied cell biology, microbial fermentation, tissue culture, and eukaryotic biotechnology. Prerequisites: BIOL 403, CHEM 404, Prerequisite/Co-requisite: BIOL 414.

BIOL 424 Applied Biotechnology Research II UD 3 SH
This course continues an introduction to the development of laboratory and research skills related to areas of biotechnolgy (Part II of II). Advanced modules included in Part II are cell and tissue culture, molecular biology and genetic engineering, bioreactor design, and good manufacturing practices. Prerequisite: BIOL 423 Applied Biotechnology Research I.

BIOL 502 General Ecology S odd 4 SH
(WI) Plants and animals in their natural surroundings. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: Two courses in BIOL. Cross-listed as ENSC 502.

BIOL 510 Seminar in Biology S odd 1 SH
(WI) A capstone course for senior biology majors only. Students will present oral and written reports on topics in contemporary biology. This is a writing intensive course.

BIOL 520 Research in the Biological Sciences F,S 2-4 SH
This course will provide students the opportunity to participate in a research project involving original research carried out under the direction of a biology faculty member. The student and faculty sponsor will create a contract to be agreed upon by the student, faculty member and Chair of the Biology Department. A written research progress report and oral report will be presented to a panel consisting of the School Head, Biology Department Chair, advisor, and faculty sponsor or instructor. Students should expect to spend 3 hours of research per week for each semester hour credit received.

BIOL 550 Internship in the Biological Sciences F, S 2-4 SH
This course will provide students an opportunity to participate in work experiences within biologically or environmentally-related industries or other off-campus venues. The student along with his/her biology faculty sponsor and on-site supervisor will develop a course contract specifying the internship objectives, expectations, and requirements for successful completion of the course by the student. In conjunction with this internship, the student will also be required to select a biological topic associated with the work experience and construct an extensive written literature review of this topic. A written work experience report and oral report will be presented to a panel consisting of the School Head, Biology Department Chair, advisor, and faculty sponsor.

 

 

 

Majors and Minors

The School of Natural and Health Sciences offers a number of majors and minors.

Majors Minors

Biology

Chemistry

Environmental Science

Exercise Science

Mathematics

Nursing

Pre-Medical Studies

 

Biology

Chemistry

Mathematics

Physics - Engineering Studies



Pre-Medical Studies - Degree Requirements

Major

PRE-MEDICAL STUDIES
72 Semester Hours Minimum
CHEM 301 General Chemistry I BIOL 411 Genetics
CHEM 302 General Chemistry II BIOL 414 Cell and Molecular Biology
CHEM 403 Organic Chemistry I BIOL 415 Vertebrate Morphology and Development
CHEM 404 Organic Chemistry II BIOL 510 Seminar in Biology
CHEM 405 Quantitative Analysis MATH 302 Calculus with Analytical Geometry I
CHEM 406 Instrumental Analysis MATH 303 Calculus with Analytical Geometry II
CHEM 503 Biochemistry PHYS 301 General Physics I
BIOL 211 General Biology I PHYS 302 General Physics II
BIOL 212 General Biology II COMP An approved computer course
BIOL 403 Microbiology    

Note: CHEM 501 Physical Chemistry I is strongly recommended.

Environmental Science - Degree Requirements

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
71 Semester Hours Minimum
CORE COURSES (47 SH):
BIOL 211 General Biology I ENSC 201 Introduction to Environmental
BIOL 212 General Biology II Science ENSC 401 Jr. Research I
BIOL 328 Conservation Biology ENSC 402 Jr. Research II
BIOL 411 Genetics ENSC 403 Environmental Science Internship
BIOL 418 Plant Physiology ENSC 501 Sr. Research I
BIOL 510 Senior Seminar ENSC 502 General Ecology
BMAL 321 Business Statistics OR
MATH 440 Probability and Statistics I
ENSC 503

Sr. Research II

CHEM 301 General Chemistry I 3 SH of a Foreign Language  
CHEM 302 General Chemistry II    
       
CHOOSE ONE TRACK:
ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY TRACK (24 SH):
BIOL 414


Cell & Molecular Biology OR
CHEM 503 Biochemistry OR
BIOL 403 Microbiology
CHEM 420


Environmental Chemistry OR
CHEM 405 Quantitative Analysis

CHEM 403 Organic Chemistry I PHYS 301 General Physics I
CHEM 404 Organic Chemistry II PHYS 302 General Physics II
       
WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AND ECOLOGY TRACK (24 SH):
BIOL 320 Biological Anthropology BIOL 415 Vertebrate Morphology
BIOL 321 Biological Evolution Biology/Natural Science Elective 1  
BIOL 350 Wildlife Biology Biology/Natural Science Elective 2  
       
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLICY TRACK (24 SH):
BIOL 350 Wildlife Biology PLSC 405 Public Policy
ECON 221 Principles of Macroeconomics Biology/Natural Science Elective 1  
PHIL 307 Environmental Philosophy Biology/Natural Science Elective 2  
PLSC 201

American Government OR
PLSC 203 World Politics
   

 

 

 

 

Pre-Medical Studies (PRMD)

The pre-medical studies curriculum is specifically designed for those students who plan to attend medical school, veterinary school, dental school, optometry school, or pharmacy school. Completion of the bachelor's degree in pre-medical studies must be followed by competitive admission to and successful completion of professional studies and training.

Environmental Science (ENSC)

The Environmental Science degree program provides an interdisciplinary curriculum centered in biology and chemistry and complemented by the study of other academic areas including public policy, ethics, law and business. Many of the major environmental issues which face our planet will be examined from a scientific viewpoint. Understanding the physical, chemical and biological controls on the environment will allow a more informed social/political discussion of environmental issues and prepare students to become professionals in the rapidly growing area of environmental science.

Below are videos featuring Pfeiffer's Dr. Luke Dollar, National Geographic Emerging Explorer, who has dedicated years to studying the fossa, Madagascar's top predator.

 

 

Biology - Degree Requirements

Major

BIOLOGY
70-72 Semester Hours Minimum

BIOL 212 General Biology II MATH 303 Calculus II OR
BIOL 411 Genetics MATH 220 College Algebra and
BIOL 510 Seminar in Biology MATH 235 College Trigonometry
CHEM 301 General Chemistry I PHYS 301 General Physics I OR PHYS 303
      Calculus-based General Physics I
CHEM 302 General Chemistry II PHYS 302 General Physics II OR PHYS 304
CHEM 403 Organic Chemistry I   Calculus-based General Physics II
CHEM 404 Organic Chemistry II AND 24 SH from electives in Biology
COMP An approved course
in computer programming
   

Plus Completion of CONCENTRATION:General Biology Concentration (70-72 SH Minimum)
Forensic Science Concentration (74 SH Minimum)
Biotechnology Concentration (72 SH Minimum)

General Biology Concentration

BIOL 403 Microbiology OR MATH 202 College Algebra AND
BIOL 414 Cell and Molecular Biology MATH 235 College Trigonometry OR
BIOL 502 Ecology OR MATH 302 Calculus with Analytical Geometry I AND
BIOL 328 Conservation Biology MATH 303 Calculus II Calculus with Analytical Geometry II
16 SH of BIOL electives

Forensic Science Concentration
74
Semester Hours Minimum
Required Courses:
BIOL 414 Cell and Molecular Biology CRIM 440 Criminalistics
BIOL 421 Forensic Science MATH 220 College Algebra
CHEM 405 Quantitative Analysis   An approved statistics course
CHEM 503 Biochemistry    

Electives (8 SH): 2 courses from the following:
BIOL 320 Biological Anthropology BIOL 420 Microbial Genetics
BIOL 403 Microbiology BIOL 550 Internship in the Biological
Sciences (4 SH)
BIOL 415 Vertebrate Morphology
and Development
CHEM 406 Instrumental Analysis

Biotechnology Concentration
72 Semester Hours
Required courses (43 SH):
BIOL 403 Microbiology BIOL 424 Applied Biotech Research II
BIOL 414 Cell and Molecular Biology BIOL 550 Internship in the Biological Sciences
BIOL 422 Molecular Genetics of Development CHEM 503 Biochemistry
BIOL 423 Applied Biotech Research I MATH 302 Calculus

Required for Biotechnology Concentration (25 SH):
BIOL 403 Microbiology BIOL 424 Applied Biotechnology Research II
BIOL 414 Cell and Molecular Biology BIOL 550 Internship in Biological Sciences
BIOL 422 Molecular Genetics of
Development
CHEM 503 Biochemistry
BIOL 423 Applied Biotechnology Research I  PLUS Electives: 1 course from the following:
BIOL 418 Plant Physiology
BIOL 420 Microbial Genetics

Minor
BIOLOGY
22 Semester Hours Minimum
BIOL 211 General Biology I BIOL 411 Genetics
BIOL 212 General Biology II BIOL 502 General Ecology
BIOL 403 Microbiology    
Additional courses in Biology to complete the minimum semester hours required.

 

 

Biology (BIOL)

two girls bio croppedThe curriculum in biology includes courses for students planning a major in the field as well as for those who pursue other majors. The General Biology I & II courses are for any student, major or non-major.

Advanced courses are designed to meet requirements of the major. However, any student with the proper background and prerequisites may choose to enroll in any of them. Students study and work in well-equipped undergraduate laboratories.

The major in biology prepares a student for graduate school or for employment as a technician or salesperson with a corporation in a biologically related field.

The biology major (like chemistry) is one that may be pursued by pre-professional students who are interested in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry or the various technologies related to the delivery of health care (medical technology, cytotechnology, physician's assistant, etc.). In all of these areas, the completion of the bachelor's degree in biology must be followed by admission to, and successful completion of, appropriate professional studies and training.

The forensic science concentration prepares students for graduate studies in forensic science or a position in a forensic science laboratory. The curriculum is designed to give students a background in molecular biology, analytical chemistry and statistical analysis.