Alumni Spotlight

Teena Mauldin Headshot.webTeena Mauldin '09-As the Executive Assistant for President Miller at Pfeiffer University, Teena Mauldin is responsible for many aspects of the President's Office. Since joining Pfeiffer, she has served in several capacities including associate director of alumni relations, coordinator of alumni events and development officer. Prior to joining the Pfeiffer family, Mrs. Mauldin worked for Wachovia Bank as a branch manager and financial specialist in Albemarle, N.C., and for the bank's wealth management division in Concord, N.C. As a non-traditional student, she earned her bachelor's degree from Pfeiffer in 2009.

“Pfeiffer is a very special place for me. As a full time wife, mother of two and full-time employee, I had put my college education on hold,” Teena said. “Pfeiffer gave me the opportunity and through flexible classroom and online delivery options to meet my busy schedule and enable me to complete my degree. Not only is Pfeiffer a wonderful environment in which to work but it has enabled me to fulfill a lifelong dream.”

 

barnoldBirgit Arnold '11'-Birgit Arnold graduated from Pfeiffer University in May 2011 with degrees in communication and journalism and a minor in intercultural studies. She is currently in her second semester of graduate school obtaining a Master of Arts degree in communication at Wake Forest University.

Birgit was an international student and found a home in the U.S. rather quickly through ISA, the Falcon's Eye newspaper and Wick Sharp Learning Center at Pfeiffer University.

“I would not be where I am today, if it were not for the faculty and staff, who not only welcomed me with open arms, but became mentors and life-long friends,” Birgit said. “It is those people who I think of when I think of Pfeiffer University, and they made my time at Pfeiffer University that much more special.”

 Jason ParnellJason Parnell '06-Jason Parnell found Pfeiffer to be one of the most welcoming environments he had ever experienced. Communications majors and faculty were “like a big family.” After his first semester, he came to know a person who changed his life forever, his mentor and advisor, Charisse Levine. Levine made him see the potential he had and how to apply it for a greater good. Jason, with Charisse as his advisor, completed internships with The Charlotte Bobcats, WCCB FOX Charlotte and was the editor-in-chief of The Falcon's Eye.

In 2006, Jason accepted a job opportunity at Clear Channel Communications. There, he had the opportunity to network with many influential members of the music industry. Afterward, Parnell and fellow alum, Bear Frazer, teamed up to shoot a pitch film for Frazer's screenplay “The Bam Theory.” The film is currently in contract negotiations.

Jason Parnell is now a master consultant for a media company named Six Foot Kitten. He enjoys every minute of his life living debt free and wealthy, which he credits to a career life planning course he took at Pfeiffer.

Communication-Courses Offered

 

COMM 103 Falcon's Eye F;S Activity-1 SH

Any unpaid staff member of the Falcon's Eye (student newspaper) may obtain activity credit for work performed by registering for Falcon's Eye. In order to receive credit, the student will be required to attend a workshop at the beginning of each semester and attend all but one of the staff meetings. The student will receive training in newspaper reporting, layout, production, photography, and business management. Evaluation and determination of pass/not pass grade will be decided by the advisor.

COMM 106 The Pfeiffer Phoenix
F;S Activity-1 SH

Any unpaid staff member of The Pfeiffer Phoenix (literary magazine) may obtain activity credit for work performed by registering for The Pfeiffer Phoenix. In order to receive such credit, the student will be required to attend a workshop at the beginning of the fall semester and attend all but one of the staff meetings. The student will receive practical training in criticism and selection, layout, and composition production, business management, and art. Evaluation and determination of pass/not pass grade will be decided by the advisor.

COMM 200 Public Speaking F;S 3 SH
Speech-making; students prepare and deliver short, informative, entertaining and persuasive presentations.
COMM 204 Communication Technology F 3 SH

This course examines the past and current developments of communication technologies from seals and clay tablets to text-messages and mp3s. The course challenges students to examine the influence of major media companies over access to and content of new media as well their use of media across a variety of different platforms.

COMM 209 Introduction to Video Production F 3 SH
Digital video production studies the principles of producing, directing, and editing techniques for digital video. Students script, storyboard, shoot, and edit short video projects. The course instructs students on the proper handling and use of digital video equipment including video cameras, lighting, and microphones. Students are also taught how to construct finished film projects on non-linear editing software with an introduction to compositing and DVD development software.
COMM 213 TV Behind the Scenes S even 3 SH
A look inside the world of television including video production techniques, editing basics, acting and reporting performance for the camera, producing, writing entertainment scripts, TV pilots and program acquisition and promotion.
COMM 250 Media & Society F 3 SH

A look at different media professions in the United States and how they fulfill various functions in society. Includes a basic introduction to human communication as well as a critical analysis of different mass media objectives and outcomes. Students will also engage in role-playing exercises to understand the way different mass media influence society.

COMM 300 Career Life Planning S even 3 SH

Intrapersonal, interpersonal, and group dynamics as they relate to career decision-making; the processes of both entering the work world, changing from the role of student and changing careers. Theory related to the perceptual process, impression formation and social influence will be examined throughout. Opportunities for personal assessment will be provided and examined objectively as options available for personal choices.

COMM 303 Digital Culture F odd 3 SH
This class examines the emergence of digital cultures through the practice of networkedcommunication. It surveys the social and communication practices of online communities regarding issues such as identity, labor, organization, power, and knowledge. Students will be encouraged to reflect on what it means to be born surrounded by digital communication technology and how this shapes the meaning of community, society, and culture.
COMM 305 Multimedia Production F even 3 SH

This is a production course designed to instruct students in the basic skills necessary for a competent communication with interactive communication technology. Students will gain diverse technological experience working with animation, digital art, graphics and interface design, hypermedia storytelling, digital video, and webcasting. Students will receive training and produce content in such programs as Adobe Photoshop, Flash, Dreamweaver, and Microsoft Movie Maker.

COMM 307 (WI) Visual Rhetoric F odd  3 SH

Visual Rhetoric examines visual images and artifacts to understand how they can persuade and impact perceptions and choices. Students will rhetorically analyze and interpret visual forms of communication such as photography, cartoons, art, museums, and commemorative sites. Will include one or more required field trips

COMM 309 Introduction to Video Production S even 3 SH

Digital video production studies the principles of producing, directing, and editing techniques for digital video. Students script, storyboard, shoot, and edit short video projects. The course instructs students on the proper handling and use of digital video equipment including video cameras, lighting, and microphones. Students are also taught how to construct finished film projects on non-linear editing software with an introduction to compositing and DVD development software.

COMM 311 Intercultural Communication S 3 SH

In this course, students will gain up-to-date knowledge of major world cultures, socioeconomic trends, demographic shifts, inter/intra cultural relations, and the implications of technical progress. This course satisfies the oral communications requirement. Besides public speaking practice, students will receive training in cross cultural effectiveness for the workplace, and for social situations. First semester international students may enroll only with the instructor's permission.

COMM 312 Falcon's Eye Editorial Staff F;S 1 SH

Those in the Journalism Sequence must enroll as a staff member of The Falcon's Eye student newspaper for a minimum of three semesters for a total of three semester hours of academic credit. Each student will be assigned to a staff position. After the third semester, students may continue on the newspaper staff and earn University activity credit.

COMM 314 (WI) Editorial and Feature Writing S even 3 SH
Practice and instruction in writing features, editorials and long-form pieces for the print
media. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COMM 325.
COMM 316 Small Group Communication S odd 3 SH

Theoretical and practical aspects of small group communication, focusing on use of small groups in the organizational and business sector.

COMM 317 (UD) Ethics and Morality in Media UD 3 SH
Students will analyze the ethical and moral dilemmas faced by journalists and media institutions. Students will apply philosophical theories to practical case studies in order to gain a greater understanding of the difficult decisions faced by news managers and entertainment executives on a daily basis. This is a writing intensive course.
COMM 320 Film Art S even 3 SH

Introduction to the art of filmmaking. Students will learn how to analyze and critique film as an art form.

COMM 325 (WI) Newswriting F 3 SH

Students learn the basic techniques for writing news for print, broadcast and internet. Includes interviewing, reporting, researching and writing news stories. The inverted pyramid, Wall Street Journal method and other newswriting principles will be used in this practical application course. This is a writing intensive course.

COMM 327 Film Genres F even 3 SH
This class invites students to study films representing a particular type, class, or auteur. Genres examined will vary. The final project in the course will involve student production of a film duplicating the genre under study.
COMM 330 Public Relations S odd 3 SH

Study of the practice of public relations and promotion in various communication contexts. Prerequisites: ENGL 202.

COMM 335 (WI) Writing for TV and Radio S even
3 SH

Writing seminar focusing on newswriting techniques for radio and television. Includes writing VOs, VOSOTs and PKGs for television, wraps for radio and tease writing. Focus on writing to picture and sound for broadcast. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COMM 325, transfer equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

COMM 345 Business Communication UD 3 SH

Forms and techniques of business communication including presentations, business letters, resumes, reports, and business vocabulary. Regular drills in grammar, punctuation, and usage. Research paper on a business-oriented topic required. Prerequisite: ENGL 202 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 350 Relational Communication S even 3 SH

A survey of concepts, theories, and research related to human interaction. Issues related to how communication affects personal relationships will be explored. Special emphasis on small group processes including decision-making, problem-solving, power, and leadership. Prerequisite: COMM 204.

COMM 353 Diversity Issues in a Global Context F even 3 SH

This course involves the study of cultural diversity and multiculturalism by focusing on differences in communicative behavior among various global communities. Emphasis will be placed on increasing students' awareness of significant differences in world view and the potential for negative outcomes of those views, specifically when operating from an ethnocentrist standpoint. The impact of variations in communication strategies on significant life issues will be explored.

COMM 360 Organizational Communication F 3 SH

Students will investigate theoretical and practical issues in various business, educational, social, and industrial organizations. Students will consider traditional and modern concepts of communication behaviors, efficiency, and effectiveness issues, information flow, and the effect of individual characteristics in the work group as well as the work group's influence on the individual. The concept of change will be integrated throughout the course. This course includes a service learning component.

COMM 380 Theories of Communication F 3 SH

Serves to connect theories, systems and models commonly covered in communication and media studies to research methodology. Critical study of published reports in the contemporary literature of the field. Prerequisite: COMM 204 or Junior standing.

COMM 414 Conflict Transformation F odd 3 SH

Study of conflict management theory and skill processes, including active listening, assertion, negotiation, and mediation. Students will develop knowledge about the nature of conflict, the growing opportunities to utilize conflict management skills, and will develop awareness of personal styles of dealing with communicative discord.

COMM 415 (WI) Creating a Newscast UD 3 SH

Students learn the skills of producing, anchoring, writing, reporting and shooting for a local newscast. This course functions as a journalism laboratory with students working in the field as well as the classroom. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COMM 335 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 416 (WI) Investigative Reporting UD 3 SH

Students learn the tools needed to research, report and write investigative news pieces. Students will combine interviewing and writing skills with computer-assisted reporting and research to produce in-depth pieces for publication. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COMM 325

COMM 419 Evaluating Organizations S even 3 SH

Practical training along with organizational communication theory are used to evaluate various characteristics of organizations. Special emphasis on methodology used to conduct organizational audits (participant observation, focus groups, planning, conducting and interpreting surveys). Prerequisite: COMM 360.

COMM 420 Media Law: Judging Journalism F even 3 SH

A look at the laws governing media and journalism, including TV, print and internet. Includes discussions of libel, slander, privacy, fair use and copyright laws. Focus on the Socratic method for case studies. Prerequisite: COMM 250.

COMM 480 Advanced Topics in Journalism and Mass Media UD 3 SH

Examination of specific topics in journalism, film, and/or television. May be taken up to four (4) times for credit if different topics are offered each time. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COMM 490 Training and Development S odd 3 SH

Will examine the training function in various types of organizations with particular focus on the role of the manager/leader in the process of assessing needs, coaching for employee development, training and facilitating collaborative work groups. Will involve students in the development and delivery of a training project. Students will research, propose, and present a module to meet the needs of a specific organization. Prerequisite: COMM 360.

COMM 500
Communication Internship F;S 3-6 SH

All internships are arranged in conjunction with and supervised by Department of Communication faculty. They require 98 hours of supervised activity in the field and are available in a range of professions, from non-profit agencies to newspapers, businesses, and media.

COMM 520 Senior Project UD 3 SH

Supervised research or production project completed during the senior year and presented to a faculty panel for evaluation. Faculty panels for interdisciplinary concentrations will include at least one faculty member from the department in which the minor is earned. Prerequisite: Senior standing and completion and approval of research or production project proposal by supervising faculty member and the Department Chair.

COMM 525

Senior Capstone S 1 SH

The Senior Capstone is an evaluation course designed to both prepare the student for their post-graduate career and to evaluate the fruit of the student's academic labor and learning. A new 1 hour credit course taken in the senior year, in which the student will flesh out their portfolio and/or senior project as well as receive guidance on job-searching and/or applications to masters programs. The student's project and/or portfolio will be judged by the faculty. Passing this evaluation will be necessary for graduation.

Communication Faculty

burris1

Deborah Burris

Professor and Chair
203 Stokes Student Center
(704) 463-3358
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cashman1

Shaun Cashman, Ph.D.

Professor
027 Stokes Student Center
028 463-1363
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levine1

Charisse Levine

Professor
028 Stokes Student Center
(704) 463-3360
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Communication-Degree Requirements

Communication
41-47 Semester Hours, including 20 SH in the core, 12 in a concentration, 9 SH in electives, plus 6 SH of a foreign language
Core Courses: 20 Semester Hours (required of all majors)
COMM 103 Falcon's Eye (1 semester) COMM 380 Theories of Communication
COMM 200 Public Speaking COMM 417 Ethics & Morality in Media
COMM 204 Communication Technology COMM 497 Internship
COMM 325 Newswriting COMM 525 Senior Capston
Electives: 9 SH
Foreign Language: 0-6 SH

Two semesters of study of foreign language or the equivalent is required of all Communication Majors. This requirement can be met through departmental examination, completion of any two three semester hour courses of any foreign language at any level, or at least one semester of study abroad in a non-English speaking country. Note: Students planning to apply to graduate school should acquire a reading knowledge of al least one foreign language. This usually requires at least six semester hours of study beyond the intermediate level.

Concentrations:
Digital Media
Students select 4 courses from the following, one of which must be 400 level.
COMM 209 Introduction to Video Production COMM 320 Film Art
COMM 303 Digital Culture COMM 327 Film Genres
COMM 305 Multimedia Production COMM 490 Training and Development
COMM 307 Visual Rhetoric    
Journalism
COMM 420 Media Law COMM 312 Falcon's Eye Editorial Staff (3 sem.)
Choose 2 courses from the following, one of which must be 400 level.
COMM 213 TV Behind the Scenes COMM 314 Editorial and Feature Writing
COMM 250 Media & Society COMM 416 Investigative Reporting
COMM 335 Writing for TV and Radio    
Professional Communication
COMM 360 Organizational Communication    
Choose 3 courses from the following, one of which must be 400 level.
COMM 300 Career Life Planning COMM 353 Diversity Issues in a Global Context
COMM 311 Intercultural Communication COMM 414 Conflict Transformation
COMM 330 Public Relations COMM 419 Evaluating Organizations
Minor
Communication
22 Semester Hours
Core (13 SH)
COMM 103 Falcon's Eye COMM 317 Ethics & Morality in Media
COMM 200 Public Speaking COMM 380 Theories of Communication
COMM 204 Communication Technology    
Electives (9 SH):

9 semester hours selected from the academic offerings in Communication at least one of which must be at the 400 level.

The Falcon's Eye

The Falcon's Eye is Pfeiffer University's student newspaper. We publish monthly during the fall and spring sessions. The Falcon's Eye is a designated forum for free speech, and students of any major are free to become part of the newspaper's staff.

For more information on the Falcon's Eye or to submit a letter to the editor, contact:

Editors-in-Chief
Shea McDonnell
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Kimmy Goodell

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Office information:
030 Stokes Student Center