Pfeiffer University Campus

English-Secondary Education Certification

ENGLISH EDUCATION (71 SH):
Core Studies:
ENGL 314 Introduction to Literary Studies
ENGL 410 English Language and Linguistics
General Studies:
ENGL 317 American Literature to 1865 OR
ENGL 318 American Literature since 1865
ENGL 325 British Literature I OR
ENGL 326 British Literature II
Three additional courses numbered between 308 and 328
World Literature: One course chosen from ENGL 330, 354, 357, 360
Study in Depth:
ENGL 460 Theory and Practice of Teaching Writing
ENGL 501 Shakespeare
Two additional courses numbered 400 or above at least one of which must be a seminar or directed research.
Licensure:
EDUC 205 Introduction to Teaching
EDUC 306B Learner and Learning I
EDUC 321 Research & Assessment in Education
EDUC 322 Diversity in Education
EDUC 360 Technological Applications for Education
EDUC 406 B Learner Learning II -- Secondary
EDUC 503 Senior Seminar and Field Experience
EDUC 500C English Methods OR EDUC 500 Secondary Methods
EDUC 500L Secondary Methods Laboratory
EDUC 540 Student Teaching -- Secondary
Foreign Language:
Two semesters of study of foreign language or the equivalent is required of all English majors. This requirement can be met through departmental examination, completion of any two three credit courses of any foreign language at any level, or at least one semester of study abroad in a non-English speaking country. Note: Students planning to apply to graduate programs should acquire a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language. This usually requires at least six semester hours of study beyond the intermediate level. Students completing the English Education major are encouraged to complete at least six semester hours of Spanish.
 

English Education-Courses Offered

 

NOTE: ENGL 202 College Writing is a prerequisite for ALL English (ENGL) courses at or above the 300 level.
ENGL 200 English Proficiency F; S 3 SH
Review of fundamentals of English grammar, mechanics, and usage. Extensive practice with in-class writing, revision and editing will be included.
ENGL 201 Introduction to College Writing F; S 3 SH

An introduction to academic reading, writing and critical thinking, students in this course will undertake a review of the grammar of standard written English and the mechanics of collegiate writing through the study of exemplary texts drawn from across the academic disciplines. Students will produce short essays, paraphrases, summaries, and explore the concept of plagiarism and learn how to avoid it through the use of proper attribution of sources. This course must be passed with a grade of C- or better to meet the University writing requirement. Students must successfully complete or place out of this course before enrolling in ENGL 202 College Writing.

ENGL 202 College Writing F; S 3 SH

Through the close study of exemplary texts chosen from across the academic disciplines, students will explore the art of academic argumentation and the rhetoric of the academic essay. Students in this class will produce short documented essays that demonstrate their understanding of the practices of quoting, summarizing and paraphrasing source materials, developing and supporting a position on an issue, and researching topics on-line and in the library. This course must be passed with a grade of C- or better to meet the University writing requirement. Completion of this course or its equivalent is prerequisite for all writing intensive courses.

All English 300 level courses are designed to meet the general education requirement in Literature.
ENGL 306 Approaches to Literature F; S 3 SH

Theme and genre in literature, moving from simple myths to complex modern works. Critical composition and research writing are required.

ENGL 308 (WI) Introduction to Poetry F even 3 SH
Study of forms and practices related to the creation, criticism and interpretation of poetry.
ENGL 313 (WI) Introduction to Short Fiction F even 3 SH
Study of forms and practices related to the creation, criticism, and interpretation of short fiction.
ENGL 314 (WI) Introduction to Literary Studies F 3 SH
Introduction to the formal study of literature as an academic discipline including the practices of interpretation, criticism, and research in the context of contemporary literary theory and classical critical texts. Required of all English majors and minors. Prerequisites: ENGL 202 and sophomore standing. This is a writing intensive course.
ENGL 315 (WI) Creative Writing I F odd 3 SH
Forms and techniques of imaginative writing, mainly fiction and poetry. Students complete various writing projects, including a completed manuscript consisting of fiction, poetry, or a reasonable combination of both. Students coordinate reading assignments with their creative writing projects. This is a writing intensive course.
ENGL 317 American Literature to 1865 F odd 3 SH
Survey of American poetry, drama, and fiction from the precolumbian period through 1865.
ENGL 318 American Literature from 1865 to the Present S 3 SH
Survey of American poetry, drama, and fiction from 1865 to the present.
ENGL 319 (WI) Topics in Literature F odd; S odd 3 SH
Special topics in literary themes and genres such as African American Writers, Detective Fiction, Fiction of the American West, Southern Writers, and Women Writers. Course may be taken more than once providing a different topic is offered each time.
ENGL 320 Introduction to Film and Drama S even 3 SH
Study of forms and practices related to the creation, criticism, and interpretation of film and drama.
ENGL 325 British Literature I F even 3 SH
Study of major authors in the British tradition from the middle ages to the Restoration. 
ENGL 326 British Literature II S odd 3 SH
Study of major authors in the British tradition from the Restoration to the end of the 20th century. 
ENGL 330 (WI) Contemporary World Literature S even 3 SH
Study of major works and trends in world literature since 1945, including writers from Africa, India, the West Indies, the Americans, and Australia.
ENGL 343 (WI) C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien S even 3 SH

An exploration of major prose works of each writer including essays, short stories, and novels. The course will also examine the contributions made by Lewis and Tolkien to theological, philosophical, and literary discussions in the twentieth and twenty first centuries throughtheir writings on faith, fantasy, science fiction and mythology. Special emphasis will be given to the role of friendship in the development of the writers' works and Lewis and Tolkien's enduring place in popular culture. This is a writing intensive course. (Crosslisted as RAPT 343.)

ENGL 354 Myth and Literature of the Ancient World S odd 3 SH

Study of mythology across cultures. Myths of Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas will be examined.

ENGL 357 World Literature in Translation F even 3 SH
Major world writers from the medieval period to 1945. Writers studied will include those from the Asian, African, and European traditions.
ENGL 360 (WI) Rhetoric F even 3 SH
Introduction to the field of rhetoric, including study of major rhetoricians from Plato to Burke and the changing position of rhetoric in the field of literary and communication studies. This is a writing intensive course.

ENGL 314 and at least six additional hours in ENGL courses at the 300 level are prerequisites for all 400 and 500 level courses. This requirement can be waived by the department chair for students transferring in 50 or more undergraduate credit hours.

ENGL 410 (WI) English Language and Linguistics F even 3 SH
Examination of the history and development of the English language in its social contexts. Topics covered include: grammars and correctness, dialect, development of English, spread of English, impacts of language on society. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENGL 314 and at least six additional hours in ENGL courses at the 300 level. Note: This course does not meet the general education requirement in literature.
ENGL 411 Children's Literature S 3 SH
Children's reading interests; significant authors and illustrators; indices to children's literature; bibliographies and aids in the selection of children's books; readings in books for children through the intermediate level. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, ENGL 314 and at least six additional hours in ENGL courses at the 300 level. Cross-listed as EDUC 411.
All seminars will examine a specific topic related to the general topic listed here. These specific topics will be indicated in the course listings as offered. All seminars require the in-depth study of specific themes, periods, or authors. All seminars will require independent research and the writing of a seminar paper of at least 15 pages. ENGL 432, 435, 437, and 439 are writing intensive courses.
ENGL 431 Seminar in Adolescent Literature UD 3 SH
ENGL 432 (WI) Seminar in American Literature S 3 SH
ENGL 433 (WI) Seminar in British Literature S 3 SH
ENGL 435 (WI) Seminar in Rhetorical Studies S even 3 SH
ENGL 437 (WI) Seminar in Criticism and Theory S Odd 3 SH
ENGL 439 (WI) Seminar in World Literature F even 3 SH
ENGL 460 (WI) Theory and Practice of Teaching Writing F odd 3 SH
This course introduces various approaches to composing and revising prose. Classical and contemporary strategies for invention and editing will be studied and practiced. Class members will direct writing assignments for one another and will teach writing in other contexts such as the Learning Center. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Junior Standing, EDUC 405, SPED 200 and formal admission to the Teacher Education Program by the TEB. Corequisite: SPED 300.
ENGL 490 (WI) Directed Research UD 3 SH
Students enrolled in this class will engage in a research project with a faculty member that is of mutual interest to the participants. Students must be English majors or minors, have senior standing, and have an outlined research project developed with a member of the department faculty and approved by the Department chair at least one semester in advance of taking the course. Faculty and students will work together on completing and writing up the project results. This is a writing intensive course.
ENGL 501 (WI) Shakespeare F odd 3 SH
Selected comedies, tragedies, histories, and sonnets of Shakespeare. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ENGL 327 and Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

 

Social Studies-Degree Requirements

 

HISTORY
36 Semester Hours Minimum
Required Courses (18 SH)
HSTY 221 U.S. History to 1865 HSTY 233 Civilizations of Europe I
HSTY 222 U.S. History since 1865 HSTY 236 Civilizations of Europe II
HSTY 231 Civilizations of Asia HSTY 501 Research in History
OR
HSTY 232 Civilizations of Africa and the Middle East
OR
HSTY 235 Civilizations of Latin America

Additional Courses (18 SH) must be selected from the offerings in History at 300-level or above. At least one course from American history and at least one course from European history. At least two courses at the 400 level.

Optional Courses (up to 6 SH) may be selected from the related courses listed below:
ECON 525 History of Economic Thought
ENGL 317 American Literature to 1865
ENGL 318 American Literature since 1865
ENGL 319 Topics Literature (with permission of advisor-depending on topic)
ENGL 325 British Literature I
ENGL 326 British Literature II
ENGL 330 Contemporary World Literature
ENGL 354 Myth and Literature of the Ancient World
ENGL 357 World Literature in Translation
PHIL 301 Founders of Ancient Philosophy
PHIL 302 Founders of Modern Philosophy
PLSC 305 Modern Warfare and Politics
PLSC 306 International Intelligence and Espionage
PLSC 401 Comparative Politics
PLSC 402 Modern Political Thought
PLSC 406 The American Presidency
NOTE: Foreign languages are highly recommended for those considering graduate study in History.
HISTORY MAJOR: SOCIAL STUDIES LICENSURE TRACK (101 SH (26 SH will satisfy General Education requirements))
Required in History (21 SH)
HSTY 221 U.S. History to 1865 HSTY 233 Civilizations of Europe I
HSTY 222 U.S. History since 1865 HSTY 236 Civilizations of Europe II
HSTY 231 Civilizations of Asia HSTY 411 Current Events
OR HSTY 501 Research in History
HSTY 232 Civilizations of Africa and the Middle East
OR
HSTY 235 Civilizations of Latin America
9 semester hours must be selected from the offerings in History. At least one course from American history and at least one course from European history at 300 level  or above. At least two courses at the 400 level.
6 semester hours must be selected from the following:
ENGL 317 American Literature to 1865
ENGL 318 American Literature since 1865
ENGL 319 Topics in Literature (with permission of advisor-depending on topic)
ENGL 327 British Literature I
ENGL 328 British Literature II
ENGL 330 Contemporary World Literature
ENGL 354 Myth and Literature of the Ancient World
ENGL 357 World Literature in Translation
PHIL 301 Founders of Ancient Philosophy
Required Social Studies Classes (27 SH):
CHEM 201 Science, Technology and Modern Society I
CHEM 202 Science, Technology and Modern Society II
ECON 221 Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON 222 Principles of Microeconomics
GEOG 202 World Regions
PLSC 201 American Politics
PSYC 221 General Psychology
SOCY 301 Introduction to Sociology
Education Courses for Secondary (9-12) Programs (38 SH):
EDUC 205 Introduction to Teaching
EDUC 306B Learner & Learning I - Secondary
EDUC 321 Problems & Research in Education
EDUC 322 Diversity in Education
EDUC 360 Technological Applications for Educators
EDUC 406B Learner & Learning II - Secondary
EDUC 500 Secondary Methods, or EDUC 500B
EDUC 500L Secondary Methods Laboratory
EDUC 503 Senior Seminar & Field Experience
EDUC 540 Student Teaching-Secondary
Minor
HISTORY
27 Semester Hours Minimum
Same courses required for the Major with the exception of HSTY 501 Research in History I plus three additional history courses, 400 and above.

Social Studies-Courses Offered

HSTY 221 United States History to 1865 F 3 SH
Colonial foundations; national origins; constitutional development; territorial and economic expansion; cultural development; civil discord and war.
 
HSTY 222 United States History since 1865 S 3 SH
A continuation of HSTY 221 Reconstruction; industrial growth; the rise of progressivism; involvement in world affairs; changing social and economic patterns.
HSTY 231 Civilizations of Asia F 3 SH
The people, institutions, events, issues, and ideas which shaped Asia from the rise of civilization to the present. The course will focus on India, China and Japan.
HSTY 232 Civilizations of Africa and the Middle East S 3 SH
The people, institutions, events, issues, and ideas which shaped Africa and the Middle East from the rise of civilization to the present.
HSTY 233 Civilizations of Europe I F 3 SH
The people, institutions, events, issues, and ideas which shaped Europefrom the rise of civilization to 1789.
HSTY 235 Civilizations of Latin America F 3 SH
The people, institutions, events, issues, and ideas which shaped Latin America from the rise of civilization to the present
HSTY 236 Civilizations of Europe II S 3 SH
The people, institutions, events, issues, and ideas which shaped Europe from 1789 to the present.
HSTY 303 North Carolina History UD 3 SH
Social, political, and economic development from colonial times to the present. Prerequisite: Declared major or minor in History, Social Studies, or Education.
HSTY 311 Current Events: The Present as History S 3 SH

Significant current events, issues, or movements such as the growth of Islamic fundamentalism, global terrorism, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the AIDS epidemic, the expansion of the European Union, and the tension between China and Taiwan are studied in their historical context. Events in the United States are covered, but the focus of the course is international. An international research/service project is required. This is a designated service learning course. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

HSTY 316 History of England since 1688 S odd 3 SH
Constitutional, political, social, cultural, and economic developments from the “Glorious Revolution” to the present.
HSTY 340 The Civil Rights Movement F odd 3 SH
An in-depth look at the modern Civil Rights Movement with a focus on the years 1954-1968. The course will consider not only the development of the major leaders and organizations that struggled against the Jim Crow system of the American South, but also the local people who supplied the "foot soldiers" of the movement. Attention will also be given to the precursors of the movement as well as the after effects that continue to the present.
HSTY 345 The American South S even 3 SH
A survey of the history of the southeastern United States from the pre-colonial period to the present. The course looks especially at two themes--the development of the South as a distinctive region in the United States and the level of influence (political, cultural, economic) the region has had on the country at large. Students will explore these issues through the interpretive lens of race, class, gender, and the environment.
HSTY 390 Topics in History UD 3 SH
These one-semester reading, research and discussion courses will be offered at the discretion of the History program faculty or in response to popular demand by students.
HSTY 401 (WI) African-American History F even 3 SH
An examination of the African-American experience in the United States from 1619 to the present. Slave narratives, the writings of Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, and other prominent African-Americans, and recent documentaries will bring to life the horrors of slavery and the struggle for equality. A research project is required.This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: HSTY 221 and 222 or permission of the instructor.
HSTY 405 (WI) Civil War and Reconstruction S odd 3 SH
The causes and consequences of the abortive “Southern War for Independence”; social, economic, and political developments in the disunited states during and after the war; problems of racial adjustment; constitutional and political change during Reconstruction. A research project is required. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: HSTY 221 and 222 or permission of the instructor.
HSTY 408 (WI) Europe 1815-1914 F odd 3 SH
Interpretive survey of European history from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of WWI. Social, economic, and political transformation. Prerequisite: HSTY 236 or sophomore standing. A research project is required. This is a writing intensive course.
HSTY 409 (WI) Europe 1914-Present S even 3 SH
Interpretive survey of European History from World War I to the present. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: HSTY 236 or sophomore standing (HSTY 222 recommended).
HSTY 419 (WI) The American Revolution and Early Republic S even 3 SH
A study of the causes of the American Revolution, the British North American colonies' War for Independence, the Confederation government, the drafting and implementation of the Constitution, the early presidencies of Washington, Adams, and Jefferson. While much of the course will explore the history of the "Great Men" of the early United States, attention will be given to the social history of this era--namely what has been termed the "unknown" history of the Revolution and Early Republic. The class will consider how the massive change wrought from 1763-1808 influenced the margins of American society. A research paper is required. This is a writing intensive course.
HSTY 423 (WI) The Vietnam Era S odd 3 SH
A close look at American society during the 1960's and early 1970's with special emphasis on the conduct and consequences of the Vietnam War. Historical readings will be augmented by novels and films. A research project is required. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: HSTY 221 and 222 or permission of the instructor.
HSTY 427 Museum Internship UD 1-3 SH
Internship in conjunction with the Stanly County Historic Preservation Commission designed to give students practical experience in a museum setting. Interns will have the opportunity to learn techniques of research, collections management, and museum educa tion. Students should register for HSTY 427 for 1 semester hour of credit, HSTY 427A for 2 semester hours of credit, and 427B for 3 semester hours of credit. Prerequisite: HSTY 300 and permission of Department Chair in consultation with supervising faculty.
HSTY 428 Life in Medieval England F even 3 SH
An exploration of the ways people in all levels of Medieval English society lived and thought. Each student will be responsible for researching and discussing with the class the life of a particular kind of medieval person (i.e. noble, knight, lady, merchant, priest, nun, peasant, etc.) and for writing a fictionalized autobiography of his or her person. Prerequisite: HSTY 233 or permission of the instructor.
HSTY 430 (WI) Revolution in the Modern World F even 3 SH
A study in comparative history and in the concept of revolution. The course will deal with the French, Russian and Chinese revolutions as well as several more recent revolutions. A research project is required. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: HSTY 221, 231, 232, or 233 or sophomore standing.
HSTY 490 Topics in History UD 3 SH
These one-semester reading, research and discussion courses will be offered at the discretion of the History program faculty or in response to popular demand by students. They include such topical courses as: History of the American South, Immigration and Ethnicity, and Pre-Revolutionary America. Research projects are often required in these courses.
HSTY 501 (WI) Research in History F 3 SH
Students undertake an intensive course of study in a topic of special personal interest. Classroom exercises and discussions, oral presentations, peer evaluations, and extensive work with primary and secondary materials prepare students to write a prospectus for an article-length paper worthy of publication or presentation at an undergraduate conference. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission from instructor.

Health & Physical Education-Courses Offered

NOTE: Courses numbered 100 through 125 are Basic Physical Education activity courses and may not be repeated for credit (exception is HPED 115). *The frequency of all HPED activity course offerings will be determined by the HPED staff.

HPED 100 Aerobics * Activity -1 SH

Conditioning course in which participants exercise to music for the purpose of developing cardiovascular efficiency, strength, and flexibility.

HPED 105 Golf * Acitiviy- 1 SH

Grip, stance, and components of a good golf swing; rules, etiquette and problem shots.

HPED 106 Badminton * Activity -1 SH

Skills, rules, strategies for both singles and doubles play.

HPED 108 Jogging * Activity- 1 SH

Emphasis on the proper intensity, frequency, and duration of exercise for maximum aerobic development through jogging.

HPED 111 Tennis * Activity- 1 SH

Basic skills, strategies, and rules for singles and doubles play.

HPED 112 Intermediate Tennis * Activity- 1 SH

Advanced skills and strategies for singles and doubles play. Prerequisite: HPED 111 or p ermission of the instructor.

HPED 114 Weight Training * Activity- 1 SH

Basic weight training exercise for major muscle groups; routines appropriate for developing muscular strength and endurance.

HPED 115 Adapted Physical Education Activity * Activity- 1 SH

Special instruction in sport and physical activities; rehabilitation for individuals with temporary and permanent physical disabilities.

HPED 116 Conditioning Activities * Activity- 1 SH

Exercises which tone major muscle groups; principles of weight control; nutrition. Various aerobic exercises are emphasized.

HPED 118 Volleyball * Activity- 1 SH

Skills, rules, strategies and formations for the sport of volleyball.

HPED 120 Fitness for Life S 2 Activities- 2 SH

Skills, rules, strategies, and formations for the sport of volleyball. HPED 120 Fitness for Life S 2 Activities -2 SH A health-oriented approach toward developing and maintaining minimum levels of physical fitness for an entire lifetime. Emphasis on cardiovascular and muscular fitness, weight control and diet.

HPED 121 Basketball * Activity

Fundamentals of basketball with emphasis on team play.

HPED 123 Lifeguard Training * 2 Activities- 2 SH

American Red Cross certification. Prerequisites: CPR training and SPMM 304.

HPED 124 Swimming Activity * Activity- 1 SH

Swimming strokes and techniques; water safety; swimming for personal fitness; water sports and activities.

HPED 125 Caddie Program * Activity- 1 SH

The program is run in conjunction with the Old North State Golf Club at Uwharrie Point. Students are allowed to enroll in the course "by permission of instructor" (BPI) only.

HPED 127 Outdoor Pursuits F even Activity- 1 SH

This course provides an introduction to the field of Outdoor Education. In addition, there will be a theoretical and experiential examination of land and water outdoor pursuits. This course is to be a springboard for students to further explore the fields of Outdoor and Adventure Education as well as find recreational opportunities for themselves and others in the area that surrounds Pfeiffer University. Technical competency, program planning and implementation, safety procedures, equipment and gear use are addressed. As a result of this course, students will be prepared to participate in managed, environmentally sound, and effective outdoor pursuit programs and services.

HPED 200 Foundations of Physical Education & Sport F 3 SH

An overview of philosophical, historical, and scientific foundations of physical education and sports; principles, objectives, and career opportunities in sports medicine, sports manage ment, and physical education.

HPED 204 Aquatic Skills UD 1 SH

Skill training in strokes, water sports, and drown-proofing. Methods of teaching swimming are emphasized.

HPED 210 Health and Physical Ed. in Elem. School F 3 SH

Focuses on the importance of health and physical education in the elementary school curriculum; content development in accordance with the Healthful Living curriculum in North Carolina Standard Course of Study; selection and utilization of appropriate instructional materials and methods.

HPED 213 Personal Wellness in Modern Society S 3 SH

Study of health needs and problems designed to foster understanding and attitudes needed for intelligent decision-making related to present and future wellness behaviors.

HPED 220 Teaching and Coaching Team Sports I S even 3 SH

Teaching approaches for beginning and advanced players for the sports of softball, baseball, and basketball. Also included are coaching philosophies, strategies, conditioning programs, drills, methods of evaluation, scouting, scoring, and charting procedures for the above listed activities.

HPED 221 Teaching and Coaching Team Sports II S odd 3 SH

Teaching approaches for beginning and advanced players for the sports of soccer and volleyball. Also included are coaching philosophies, strategies, conditioning programs, drills, methods of evaluation, scouting, scoring, and charting procedures for the above listed activities.

HPED 240 Teaching and Coaching Individual Sports F 3 SH

Teaching beginning and advanced skills; training; scheduling; scouting; practice schedules; strategy; player evaluation and motivation. Sports covered include golf, tennis, cross country, and swimming.

HPED 310 Health Promotion and Life Skills F 3 SH
This course provides a comprehensive study of factors influencing health promotion and life skill
including personality, societal and biological factors. This course will emphasize knowledge, skills
and concepts necessary for the effective implementation of health education, disease prevention
and disease control. Specifically, the course will emphasize prevention through the curriculum,
identifying the high-risk student and appropriate referrals in the school system and community.
Students will gain experience using technology as a strategic resource related to this topic.
HPED 314 Movement Education K-6 S 3 SH

Adoption of a movement concept and skill theme framework for teaching children fundamental and complex motor patterns, including sport and game skills, developmental gymnastics, recreational dance, and personal fitness skills. Prerequisite: Formal admission to the Teacher Education Program by the TEB.

HPED 401 Health and Physical Education in Elem. Schools (K-6) S 3 SH

Curriculum and method of instruction for health and physical education at the elementary level. This class is designed to prepare students to teach health and physical education in grades K-5. This course includes preparation in the knowledge and skills found in the Healthful LivingCurriculum of the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. Knowledge of movement education, motor skills, skill analysis, components of health such as mental, emotional, personal and physical health. This course also provides a study of health, safety and physical education needs of elementary children (including content and methodology) and the integration of those needs with the curriculum. Public school practicum required.

HPED 401 L Health and Physical Education in Elem. Schools Lab S 1 SH

This lab course will be required of health and physical majors. It will provide the students with practical experience outside of the classroom working with local students planning, teaching and assessing physical education lessons. A minimum of 15 practicum hours will be required and will be scheduled by the instructor.

HPED 402 Health and Physical Education in Sec. Schools  (7-12) F 4 SH

This course covers the methods, materials and techniques of teaching health and physical education in secondary school which includes organization and planning of the total 7-12 curriculum and daily programs. Students develop unit plans and examine a variety of approaches for teaching middle and high school health. Strategies for improving reading skills in Health Education will be an integral part of this course. Public school practicum required.

HPED 407 (WI) Adapted Physical Education S 3 SH

This course will prepare prospective physical education and special education majors to implement a developmentally appropriate physical education curriculum for students with disabilities, consistent with the Healthful Living component of the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. Field experiences with exceptional children are included as part of the course. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Formal admission to the Teacher Education Program by the TEB.

HPED 409 Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education and Exercise Science
F 3 SH

Planning, administering, and evaluating accountability systems in physical education and exercise settings; assessment of individual achievement in psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains; analysis and interpretation of data; reliability, validity, objectivity, and other psychometric properties of tests; and considerations in selection of fitness tests for adults and children.

HPED 411 Methods of Teaching Physical Education F 4 SH

Curriculum and methods of instruction for physical education at the secondary level. This course will focus on current research and practice in physical education including, but not limited to, content analysis and development consistent with the Healthful Living component of the North Carolina Standard Course of Study, teaching strategies, planning, and assessment. Prerequisite: Formal admission to the Teacher Education Program by the TEB.

HPED 508 Licensure Preparation in Physical Education F 1 SH

This focuses on the integration of knowledge from previous coursework to prepare students for their semester of student teaching. Current trends and issues in physical education will also be addressed. Prerequisites: Senior standing and admission to the Teacher Education Program by the TEB.